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Posted by Philip on 7 August 2015, 4:37 pm in , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The employment paradox

I attended a workshop on accessible employment recently and was reminded, as I've written about before, what a fraught topic employment is these days — for anyone, let alone those with access needs.

As welfare states come crashing down around the (western) world, the demand for employment and requirement to be employed increase. New Zealand's welfare lexicon has changed from "beneficiary" to the default "jobseeker".

Meanwhile industry and technology improves, meaning more machines, computers and robots do more and more jobs for us. I mean, that has been the whole idea of industrial and technological revolutions, hasn't it? To decrease the need for humans to do stuff.

But it's like the world hasn't quite caught up with itself. There are fewer things to do, but more pressure than ever for us to be gainfully employed. It's all a bit Stupid, with a capital S, as Bernard Keane and Helen Razer might ubiquitously insist.

UK Research exploring "the future of work and how jobs, and the skills needed in the workplace, will change by 2030", gives the following key messages:

  1. Technological growth and expansion: As digitalisation grows, we can expect a significant impact on employment and skills in the decades ahead, at all levels and in all sectors.
  2. Interconnectivity and collaboration:  Work in the future will be more interconnected and network oriented.
  3. Convergence of innovation: We can expect more and more innovations to take place at the borders of disciplines and sectors.
  4. Increased individual responsibility: International competition and technological development is likely to continue to increase the flexibility that employers demand from their employees.
  5. The shrinking middle: The shrinking middle will challenge the workforce. The high-skilled minority (characterised by their creativity, analytical and problem solving capabilities and communication skills) will have strong bargaining power in the labour market, whilst the low-skilled will bear the brunt of the drive for flexibility and cost reduction, resulting in growing inequality.
  6. The four-generational (4G) workplace: The future workplace will be multi-generational, with four generations working side-by-side. Traditional notions of hierarchy and seniority will become less important.

(Key findings, The future of work: jobs and skills in 2030, UK Commission for Employment and Skills, p24-25)

If the world's idea of employment were an ostrich, its entirety is well buried in sand, not just its head. We're hardly thinking about these things — and we are far from conversing about them. Things like:

  • What happens when up-to-the-moment digital literacy is a pre-requisite for employment, given its exponential speed of development?
  • What factors influence who has access to interconnectivity and network orientation?
  • How are we encouraging innovations between disciplines and sectors?
  • What does increased employee responsibility look like?
  • If the high-skilled minority out-bargains the low-skilled majority, what becomes of "jobseekers", who are out-bid before their seeking begins? After all, to seek successfully, one must also be sought.
  • How is the education system preparing school leavers to manage and lead people of their parents' and grandparents' ages? And how are employers preparing for this somersault?

These questions are fascinating to me, but I'm fairly sure they terrify many. But we've got to start using them to lead our conversations about employment in the future.

Quite simply the question, "How do more people become employed?" is not an adequate level of inquiry anymore. To meet the huge diversity, complexity and change that is 'careering' towards us in the next 15 years, we need to be asking, "What is employment becoming?" and "Who are the employees and employers of the future?"

But, most importantly, we need to grapple with this one: "What will become the valued, dignified alternatives to employment?" Because there will be more and more people, with and without access needs, seeking them out.

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