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Viewing entries tagged with 'unique'

Limp wrist

Posted by Philip on 17 July 2017, 3:15 pm in , , , ,

I woke up on Saturday morning to find I couldn't lift my hand up with my when my palm was facing downwards. No pain, no numbness, just intermittent pins and needles or tingling and no power in the upper side of my wrist.

Limp wrist

I can move my fingers and grip, though not as powerfully as usual. If I put my palm facing upwards I can lift my hand up. My coordination is not as good as normal, which isn't saying much.

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Have we got mental health wrong?

Posted by Philip on 30 June 2017, 4:48 pm in , , , , ,

Last week I started taking anti-anxiety medication. After six years, starting with the neighbours in 2011-2012 and culminating in the car saga earlier this year, I decided I needed help. I was sick of feeling like shit most of time.

So I went to my GP last week and asked for help. He assessed me on the Kessler (K10) scale for depression and anxiety — I scored 30 out of 50, qualifying me for treatment with SRRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) and psychological therapy.

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The other side of common

Posted by Philip on 6 June 2017, 4:27 pm in , , , , , ,

In my last post I provocatively suggested using the word 'common' instead of 'similar', saying that, "Using 'common' removes the positive leaning of 'similar' and suggests a more ordinary, even boring connotation" (my emphasis).

My frolleague* in leadership, Lesley, reminded me that author Margaret Wheatley often writes about the importance of common interests in leadership and social change. A couple of quotes:

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What makes people fear difference

Posted by Philip on 1 June 2017, 4:36 pm in , , , , ,

I often write and talk about my simple definition of diversity: the synergy of our uniqueness and commonality.

In other words, the combined effect or interaction based on our differences and similarities. And we're all both similar to and different from each other, all 7.508 billion of us.

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Kintsugi and the art of being uniquely flawed

Posted by Philip on 10 July 2016, 9:43 am in , , , ,

Kintsugi is the Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with lacquer dusted or mixed with powdered gold, silver, or platinum. (Wikipedia)

As a philosophy kintsugi can be seen to have similarities to the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, an embracing of the flawed or imperfect. Japanese aesthetics values marks of wear by the use of an object. This can be seen as a rationale for keeping an object around even after it has broken and as a justification of kintsugi itself, highlighting the cracks and repairs as simply an event in the life of an object rather than allowing its service to end at the time of its damage or breakage.

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Diversity: unique, common and both

Posted by Philip on 28 October 2015, 11:39 am in , , , , ,

"Conversations with God" author Neale Donald Walsche tweeted about good and bad a couple of days ago. It got me thinking about diversity.

As you know, my perspective reframes the model of categorisation and representation, which most people associate with diversity. For me diversity is the synergy of our uniqueness and commonality.

But Walsche's tweet got me thinking again. He said:

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Day of anti-silence

Posted by Philip on 11 June 2015, 6:41 pm in , , , , , , , , , , , ,

12 June is the "Day of Silence", "a day of action in which students across New Zealand vow to take a form of silence to call attention to the silencing effect of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying, name-calling and harassment in schools."

At Epsom Girls Grammar School, however, 12 June will be a day of anti-silence. Students who are part of DIVINQ – a process targeted at senior students that I co-created with Jeannie Grant, which uses philosophical inquiry to explore the ways our identity is limited by assumptions, labels and fear of difference –will be taking a different tack.

We'll be shouting about bullying all over the school at lunchtime.

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Flying with wheels – a uniquely common event

Posted by Philip on 6 May 2015, 4:30 pm in , , , , , ,

I fly a lot. More often than I'd choose. But I fly when the need beckons – though seldom, even never, unless I'm issuing an invoice.

Last Monday saw me fly from Auckland to Wellington and back in a day – relievedly, an almost unprecedented phenomenon. I was with Sam and Kylie again (about whom I wrote a week or so back). It was Kylie's first time flying with me – or anyone using a wheelchair I believe – so Sam and I created a list of common occurrences for Kylie to "check off" as we went from airport to plane and plane to airport. Twice. In one day.

The list went something like this:

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A life of paradox, power and privilege

Posted by Philip on 17 January 2015, 11:01 am in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

arrow pointing left and rightFollowing on from my last post about rebranding, I’ve also changed how I describe myself or, more accurately, my experience. I talk about "my paradoxical experience as a queer, caucasian, cisgender man with unique function (disability).”

Even doing this is paradoxical, given I argued the point in 2012 at TEDxAuckland that we need to decay labels to reveal diversity. But I’m doing it to explain a phenomenon of power, privilege and paradox, rather than to label myself.

Power and privilege have long been part of the politics of diversity and discrimination. Recently I heard another diversity expert, Leslie Hawthorne, encourage those with privilege to raise awareness of it by, for example, not using the word “lame" to describe something that is bad or stupid, because you are implying that people who can’t walk are bad or stupid*.

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If you think disability is limiting...

Posted by Philip on 22 July 2013, 7:32 pm in , , ,

...watch this and think again.

Confused? Contact me.

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