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Viewing entries tagged with 'media'

The Trump era of online lies, fake news and bad behaviour

Posted by Philip on 5 December 2017, 1:55 pm in , ,

I've been reflecting on the aggressive change in the tone of a lot of online publishing and social media. It seems to me that, while online trolls are nothing new, their volume and voracity have increased profoundly since Donald Trump became the so-called leader of the free world.

In short, in just over a year, Trump seems to have normalised fake news, hatred and bullying on the internet. I'd go further to say that he has popularised it.

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Latest musing on disability in the media

Posted by Philip on 25 October 2016, 5:08 pm in , , , , , , , , ,

Recently a third year student at the University of Winchester studying Theatre Production (Arts & Stage Management) contacted me. Her focal topic is looking at "able bodied performers portraying disabled [people] and how we, as participants in the arts industry, feel about it."

She sent me some questions and here's how I responded:

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Owning my projection; an acknowledgement and apology

Posted by Philip on 7 October 2015, 7:04 am in , , , , , , , , , ,

I got a fair bit of flack for the post I wrote on Friday, asking disabled people to toughen up and stop telling their stories of hardship in public. I also criticised inspirational speakers, as well as media portrayal of disabled people triumphantly doing ordinary things.

I'm not used to the kind of negative vitriole with which a few people responded — it was quite affronting and upsetting. Nevertheless, I should note, my disparaging audience was balanced ten-fold by those who liked the post. I've been reflecting on the reason for the offence and, prompted by a question by a more balanced commenter, why I feel so strongly about this issue. After all, strong reactions are mainly fuelled by psychological projection.

So, what I wrote was about me, not about the people I criticised. To answer the question, "Why is it affecting you personally so strongly?" I've reflected on what's going on for me.

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How the forces of the arts, media and culture influence and shape our thinking and our national identity

Posted by Philip on 21 August 2015, 12:53 pm in , , , , , , ,

This week I was part of a panel for Leadership New Zealand tasked with speaking to this post's title. No pressure. By the time Dr Wayne Hope (AUT University), Qiujing Wong (Borderless), Rewi Spraggon and myself had traversed it, it was obvious how broad the topic was.

I could begin to speak on behalf of my fellow panellists, but thought I'd share my thoughts.

I began by sharing this media release I wrote in 2005 in response to the then National Party's appointment of Wayne Mapp as "Political Correctness Eradicator". Aside from the stupidity of the role, I pointed out that, ten years on, the token gestures paid to diversity in the arts, media and cultural spheres haven't really increased.

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Should kids have to keep themselves safe?

Posted by Philip on 26 June 2014, 2:12 pm in , , , , , , , , , , , ,

On Wednesday Violence Free Waitakere (VFW) launched "'Jade Speaks Up', a new multimedia resource to help keep children safe from violence." The media release said, "The resource aims to help children put safety strategies in place to support themselves, should they feel afraid in their lives whether from bullying, natural disasters, adult threats or witnessing grown-ups fighting."

*    *    *    *    *

Sign the KIDshine petition urging Rt Hon John Key to end our 'national shame’ of domestic violence and child abuse.

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Social media — between a click and a nasty place

Posted by Philip on 26 February 2014, 1:36 pm in , , , ,

Over the last couple of days, social media has shown its bitchy side, rather than outright bullying, but you have to ask which is worse. Blogs like these by Deborah Hill Cone and David Herkt (you might want to read to the end before you click those links) about Charlotte Dawson's suicide have shown how easy it is to spit bile from your keyboard behind the anonymous veil of the internet.

Whaleoil had its comeuppance with its January headline, "Feral dies in Greymouth, did world a favour."

The insidious side to nasty posts like these is that it's nigh on impossible to voice dissent. In the virtual economy of click value, no matter what you may say on or about a post, be it positive or negative, you've already reinforced its writer or the site's editor/owner by your mere presence on their site. You're a "visit" and the more visits, the more popular the post and the higher their rating in the game of internet traffic.

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In defence of Justin Bieber and other child celebrities

Posted by Philip on 31 January 2014, 10:39 am in , , , , ,

I've been pretty unimpressed with the rather ugly responses to Justin Bieber's misdemeanours over the last few days. Sure, some of the reactions have been comical, like this YouTube video, and RuPaul's tweet of his rather beautifully made-up mugshot (I've just been told it's transphobic — no offence intended).

But a 100,000-signature petition to have him deported from the US, for doing something that a good many, if not most, teenage boys do, seems pretty mean-spirited and exaggerated to me. Particularly as Americans have, until now, been happy to claim him as their own (I didn't even know he was Canadian until this hit the news).

The blatant exploitation of child celebrities by the music, film and television industry has never sat well with me. Michael Jackson is a classic example of what happens when children are exposed to the crazy hype of modern entertainment from too early an age.

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What I do...

Posted by Philip on 18 August 2013, 12:06 pm in ,

...in case you wondered.

Source:  Sunday Star Times.

Text of the article available here (.doc)

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Interactive media manipulation lacks integrity @TheVoteNZ

Posted by Philip on 18 June 2013, 9:00 pm in , , , , ,

Until this week I've enjoyed TV3's interactive debate show, The Vote. It's covered some interesting topics - drugs, racism and tax. They don't claim to be scientific, but it's an entertaining, if not reasonably vague, representation of public opinion.

This week though, I think they've gone too far. "This Month's Debate," shouts the website, "Our kids - The problem’s not poverty, it’s parenting. Do you agree?"

The moot is "poorly" put, as I tweeted, pun intended. It is confusing. "The problem’s not poverty, it’s parenting." Poverty is systemic; parenting is individual.

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That's what it's all about, but can we build the app? #lifehackhq

Posted by Philip on 8 March 2013, 6:12 pm in , , , , , , ,

This time last week I wrote a fairly candid post about the Government's Youth Mental Health Social Media Innovations Fund, in particularly Lifehack, the "sustainable technology solution to combat New Zealand’s youth mental illness problems". Today I met with them.

I won't go into the content of the meeting. That would be, at best, tedious for you and, at worst, onerous for me. But I will share my reflection on the "launch >blog > tweet, tweet, tweet > email > meet" process of the last week.

Firstly, we disagreed and allowed the disagreement. I've blogged before that I believe that where communities struggle with diversity is in their need to hear or to speak with one voice and that they need to decay agreement.

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