DiversityNZ logo

Viewing entries tagged with 'functional diversity'

A mash-up about Blogging Against Disablism Day #BADD2016

Posted on 1 May 2016, 12:24 pm in , , , , , , ,

Blogging Against Disablism Day, May 1st 2016

1 May is the eleventh annual Blogging Against Disablism Day. "This is the day where all around the world, disabled and non-disabled people blog about their experiences, observations and thoughts about disability discrimination (known as disablism or ableism). In this way, we hope to raise awareness of inequality, promote equality and celebrate the progress we've made," says the official site.

I've blogged a couple of times. This year I'm doing a mash-up of those two posts because they still represent my views.

Continue reading...

Rethinking for scrutiny, not to be right

Posted by Philip on 17 May 2014, 11:27 am in , , , , , , , ,

it's a new ideaFor about seven years I've guest lectured in the Concepts of Rehabilitation paper at AUT University. The students come from a wide range of disciplines including physiotherapy, chiropractics, nursing and occupational therapy.

I ask that students prepare by reading my journal article, Constructive Functional Diversity (CFD), which quite radically challenges the binary notion of disability and non-disability, and suggests new language for the mainly medicalised ideas behind rehab. It also challenges the focus of functional improvement in favour of considering functional value instead.

Then we have a 90-minute conversation.

Continue reading...

Thinking about the box, rather than outside it

Posted by Philip on 13 April 2014, 2:01 pm in , , , , , , , , , , ,

box with question marksWe often hear people utter the mantra, “Think outside the box.” It’s become the hold-all for creative thinking, problem solving and even good leadership.

But how often do we often think about the box itself? How often do we consider that, by thinking outside it, we stray away from the box — even ignore it completely — and miss the truth of the matter:

The box is the problem. It’s too big, too small, the wrong shape, the wrong colour.

Continue reading...

Loading...