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Viewing entries tagged with 'diversity'

Happy New Year! Change is afoot…

Posted by Philip on 1 January 2016, 6:34 pm in , , , ,

Happy New Year. I hope your celebrations were safe and fun.

I've started 2016 by creating a brand, spanking new website for Diversity New Zealand — you can see it here! (I know, I'm a geek!)

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Grappling with the alone (all-one)

Posted by Philip on 22 December 2015, 12:43 pm in , , , , , , , , ,

This time of year is difficult for me. To say I dread it is an over-statement, but I do steel myself for it and it's an exercise in endurance getting through it.

I struggle with being alone. I'm not lonely though, don't get me wrong. And I don't want to surround myself with people.

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Diversity and the re-orientation of awareness

Posted by Philip on 10 December 2015, 11:00 am in , , , , ,

In the 1980s, 90s and early 2000s I ran awareness workshops. They were focussed on raising awareness of others' diversity, often a certain aspect or characteristic: their disability, sexuality, etc. I also attended workshops aimed at raising my awareness of others, eg. cultural diversity.

I've been reflecting on the work I do now, in particular sessions I've led for ATEED and Idea Services' Autism and Specialist Support team in the last week. I realise I've totally re-oriented the role of awareness in understanding and responding to diversity.

These days I work with people to increase their awareness of themselves, to develop self-awareness.

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New Zealand’s superdiversity — really?

Posted by Philip on 17 November 2015, 10:07 am in , , , ,

A new organisation, the Superdiversity Centre, sprung up last week, launching two reports: "The Superdiversity Stocktake: Implications for Business, Government and New Zealand" and "The Superdiversity, Democracy and New Zealand’s Electoral and Referenda Laws."

At 350 pages with the Executive Summary on page 215, excuse me for not reading the Stocktake. When I finally found the Executive Summary and skimmed its nine point font, it said Government needed to move faster on superdiversity because its responsiveness to ethnic diversity is slower than business.

The Electoral and Referenda Laws report is slightly more digestible at 69 pages but I could still only bring myself to skim its equally small typefaced Executive Summary, albeit more logically located on page 4. It, like the Stocktake, defines 'superdiversity' as NZ's ethnic and migrant population. The report makes the point that this population is increasing and warns of under-representation in voting if laws don't include access for non-English speaking citizens.

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NZ Diversity Consultant named Top 10 in first ever Global Diversity List

Posted by Philip on 31 October 2015, 5:38 pm in , , ,

Today I was honoured to be recognised in the first ever assessment of the world’s leading authorities on diversity.

See media release »

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Diversity: unique, common and both

Posted by Philip on 28 October 2015, 11:39 am in , , , , ,

"Conversations with God" author Neale Donald Walsche tweeted about good and bad a couple of days ago. It got me thinking about diversity.

As you know, my perspective reframes the model of categorisation and representation, which most people associate with diversity. For me diversity is the synergy of our uniqueness and commonality.

But Walsche's tweet got me thinking again. He said:

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How the forces of the arts, media and culture influence and shape our thinking and our national identity

Posted by Philip on 21 August 2015, 12:53 pm in , , , , , , ,

This week I was part of a panel for Leadership New Zealand tasked with speaking to this post's title. No pressure. By the time Dr Wayne Hope (AUT University), Qiujing Wong (Borderless), Rewi Spraggon and myself had traversed it, it was obvious how broad the topic was.

I could begin to speak on behalf of my fellow panellists, but thought I'd share my thoughts.

I began by sharing this media release I wrote in 2005 in response to the then National Party's appointment of Wayne Mapp as "Political Correctness Eradicator". Aside from the stupidity of the role, I pointed out that, ten years on, the token gestures paid to diversity in the arts, media and cultural spheres haven't really increased.

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The employment paradox

Posted by Philip on 7 August 2015, 4:37 pm in , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I attended a workshop on accessible employment recently and was reminded, as I've written about before, what a fraught topic employment is these days — for anyone, let alone those with access needs.

As welfare states come crashing down around the (western) world, the demand for employment and requirement to be employed increase. New Zealand's welfare lexicon has changed from "beneficiary" to the default "jobseeker".

Meanwhile industry and technology improves, meaning more machines, computers and robots do more and more jobs for us. I mean, that has been the whole idea of industrial and technological revolutions, hasn't it? To decrease the need for humans to do stuff.

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When too many rights make a wrong

Posted by Philip on 29 July 2015, 10:01 am in , , , , , , , ,

'Right' is an interesting word. It can refer to the state of being correct, a (legal) entitlement, a conservative political stance, the opposite direction to left, among other things.

But the belief that one is right about, or has a right to, a certain thing, with no willingness to change stance, can lead to a varying number of undesirable outcomes. It also ignores the diversity and complexity involved in a lot of decision-making processes.

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From diversity to inclusion

Posted by Philip on 16 June 2015, 7:41 am in , , , , , ,

Update:
View slides on SlideShare »

The question of diversity and inclusion in schools is by no means a new one. Some do it well, some refuse and most, I would say, are just not sure where to start.

Preparing a keynote for Auckland Careers and Transition Educators –whose "main focus is on the career education of youth and their transition into the wider world of employment, training and/or further education", I began by reflecting on the question, "Can we get straight from diversity to inclusion?" It occurred to me that, no, we can't.

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